Conservation through cricket

Help us create awareness on sustainable wildlife conservation and make all of us guards against ongoing rampant poaching of our endangered wild animals. Make a donation here

 





Members of the Maasai Cricket Warriors (L-R) Sambu Sintario, Feancis Ole Mishami, Sonyanga Ole Ngais and Jonathan Ole Mishami pose for a photohraph with the last surviving male northern white rhino named 'Sudan' after playing against the British Army Training Unit (BATUK) cricket team during a charity tournament called the "Last Male Standing" at the Ol Pejeta Conservancy in Laikipia national park, Kenya June 14, 2015. The Maasai Cricket Warriors actively campaign against retrogressive traditional practices, such as female genital mutilation and early childhood marriages, while fighting to eradicate discrimination against women in Maasailand. REUTERS/Thomas Mukoya

Members of the Maasai Cricket Warriors (L-R) Sambu Sintario, Feancis Ole Mishami, Sonyanga Ole Ngais and Jonathan Ole Mishami pose for a photohraph with the last surviving male northern white rhino named ‘Sudan’ after playing against the British Army Training Unit (BATUK) cricket team during a charity tournament called the “Last Male Standing” at the Ol Pejeta Conservancy in Laikipia national park, Kenya June 14, 2015. The Maasai Cricket Warriors actively campaign against retrogressive traditional practices, such as female genital mutilation and early childhood marriages, while fighting to eradicate discrimination against women in Maasailand. REUTERS/Thomas Mukoya

The biodiversity of Kenya is seriously threatened, mainly by human activities. In the larger Laikipia district, the direct causes of environmental degradation are linked to over-harvesting of trees for fuel, destruction of catchment areas combined with over-grazing of livestock as well as sand harvesting. However, the underlying causes of the threats are linked to a dearth of alternative revenue resources, lack of education and training opportunities, local poverty and demographic pressures.

Through this cricket development programme children and youth are afforded the opportunity to visit the Ol Pejeta Conservancy on outreach programmes that target conservation education. The children and youth will also be engaged in regular environmental clean-ups, tree planting exercises and recycling initiatives.

The conversion of biodegradable waste into combustible fuel briquettes is an alternative source of fuel that will reduce the need of felling trees for use in charcoal production and it will also generate valuable income for the youth. This is a project that we are currently engaged in and we are working on a pilot project to convert invasive cactus plants into fuel briquettes.

Support us. Donate below and count yourself part of a project that makes this planet a better place than we found it. We count on you.